Cancer

MicroRNAs and Hippo: Connected in cancer

February 27, 2014

A Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) collaboration between a molecular chemist who studies microRNAs and a stem cell biologist interested in cell growth has led to new understanding of what goes wrong in several kinds of cancer.

Boston Children’s Hospital scientists Richard Gregory, PhD, and Fernando Camargo, PhD, who is also at Harvard’s Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, discuss their joint research project, published by Cell, in this video abstract:... Read more about MicroRNAs and Hippo: Connected in cancer

Harvard-led researchers offer potential new treatments for subtype of acute myeloid leukemia

December 23, 2013

An international team of researchers working in the Boston and Singapore labs of Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) Blood Program leader Daniel Tenen, MD, recently identified new candidates for the treatment of an acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtype caused by mutations of CEBPA, a tumor suppressor. The findings were published in two separate studies:... Read more about Harvard-led researchers offer potential new treatments for subtype of acute myeloid leukemia

“Good” cells can go “bad” in a “bad neighborhood"

March 22, 2010

The general theory of cancer development holds that malignancies occur because of the presence of certain genetic elements within the affected cells.

But a new study by Harvard researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) indicates that “good” cells can become cancerous because of exposure to a “bad” environment within the body — similarly to the way a “good boy” may turn to crime when exposed to the pressures of life in a crime-ridden neighborhood.

In their paper in today’s edition of the journal Nature, David T. Scadden and colleagues report that normal blood stem...

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Cross-country collaboration leads to new model of leukemia development

July 31, 2013

Eight years ago, two former Stanford University postdoctoral fellows, one of them still in California and the other at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) in Cambridge, began exchanging theories about why patients with leukemia stop producing healthy blood cells. What was it, they asked, that caused bone marrow to stop producing normal blood-producing cells?... Read more about Cross-country collaboration leads to new model of leukemia development

Bone drug kills resistant cancer stem cells by making home unlivable

November 6, 2013

A bone drug already on the market for osteoporosis may kill chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) stem cells thought to persist in the bone marrow after standard therapy, lowering the likelihood of disease recurrence, according to a new study in mice led by researchers at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI), the Harvard Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, and Massachusetts General Hospital.... Read more about Bone drug kills resistant cancer stem cells by making home unlivable

An HSCI approach to rhabdomyosarcoma

September 29, 2013

Rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare childhood cancer that arises in muscle stem cells. Between 250-350 cases are treated each year. The disease most commonly begins as a noticeable swelling in the arms, legs, head, neck, or groin, and is treated by surgical removal of the tumor, as well as chemotherapy or irradiation. Currently, about 80% of patients diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma survive, as the disease is often caught early enough for intervention.

In this feature, one senior investigator, one junior investigator, and one postdoctoral researcher—all working...

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