Cancer

Targeted BMI1 inhibition impairs tumor growth lung adenocarcinomas with low CEBPα Expression

August 3, 2016

Researchers at the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore (NUS), in collaboration with Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI), have discovered a new way in which the development of lung cancer can be stopped. In a study published in Science Translational Medicine, the researchers found that inhibiting a protein called BMI1 impaired tumour growth in lung cancer.

The study was led by HSCI Principal Faculty member Daniel Tenen, MD, his associate Elena Levantini, PhD, and included first author Dr Kol Jia Yong, a former CSI Read more about Targeted BMI1 inhibition impairs tumor growth lung adenocarcinomas with low CEBPα Expression

MicroRNAs and Hippo: Connected in cancer

February 27, 2014

A Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) collaboration between a molecular chemist who studies microRNAs and a stem cell biologist interested in cell growth has led to new understanding of what goes wrong in several kinds of cancer.

Boston Children’s Hospital scientists Richard Gregory, PhD, and Fernando Camargo, PhD, who is also at Harvard’s Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, discuss their joint research project, published by Cell, in this video abstract: Read more about MicroRNAs and Hippo: Connected in cancer

Harvard-led researchers offer potential new treatments for subtype of acute myeloid leukemia

December 23, 2013

An international team of researchers working in the Boston and Singapore labs of Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) Blood Program leader Daniel Tenen, MD, recently identified new candidates for the treatment of an acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtype caused by mutations of CEBPA, a tumor suppressor. The findings were published in two separate studies: Read more about Harvard-led researchers offer potential new treatments for subtype of acute myeloid leukemia

“Good” cells can go “bad” in a “bad neighborhood"

March 22, 2010

The general theory of cancer development holds that malignancies occur because of the presence of certain genetic elements within the affected cells.

But a new study by Harvard researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) indicates that “good” cells can become cancerous because of exposure to a “bad” environment within the body — similarly to the way a “good boy” may turn to crime when exposed to the pressures of life in a crime-ridden neighborhood.

In their paper in today’s edition of the journal Nature, David T. Scadden and colleagues report that normal blood stem Read more about “Good” cells can go “bad” in a “bad neighborhood"

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