Bioengineering

Healing without scars

November 7, 2018

George Murphy wants to use stem cells to replace scarring with regenerative healing.

  • George Murphy’s goal is to coax skin stem cells into healing wounds by regenerating tissue instead of forming a scar.
  • To figure out how to do it, he is studying scarless healing during fetal development and “stem cell burnout” during aging.
  • Insights into scarless healing will help research into regenerating other vital organs, including the heart.

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Harald Ott and team from MGH creates functional, stem cell-derived small bowel segments

October 10, 2017

Press release of the Massachusetts General Hospital

Using human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), a Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) research team has bioengineered functional small intestine segments that, when implanted into rats, were capable of deliver nutrients into the bloodstream. The investigators describe their accomplishment in the online journal Nature Communications.

“In this study we have been able to bridge the gap between differentiation of single cells – driving stem cells to become a specific cell type – and the...

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Harvard scientists report on novel method for extending the life of implantable devices in situ

April 13, 2016

New approach offers promise for long-term efficacy

by Kelly Lawman, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 

Blood-contacting implantable medical devices, such as stents, heart valves, ventricular assist devices, and extracorporeal support systems, as well as vascular grafts and access catheters, are used worldwide to improve patients’ lives. However, these devices are prone to failure due to the body’s responses at the blood-material interface; clots can form and inflammatory reactions can prevent the device from performing as indicated....

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