News

Call for Proposals: P01 Pilot Grants 2019

December 17, 2018

The Harvard Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology (HSCRB) invites applications for Pilot Grant funding for 2019 under the NIH-funded P01 grant “Dissecting the establishment and regulation of human pluripotency” (PI Alexander Meissner). The purpose of this funding program is to provide resources for proof-of-concept studies. These pilot grants are intended to increase our understanding of the basic biology of human pluripotent cells and their utility for translational...

Read more about Call for Proposals: P01 Pilot Grants 2019

HSCI-supported research leads to new class of therapeutics

December 13, 2018

Biotech company Moderna, co-founded by HSCI scientist Derrick Rossi, is set to bring a new class of treatments to patients.

Summary

  • Derrick Rossi’s research into using mRNA as a new kind of therapeutic was initially supported by HSCI seed funding, and gave rise to biotech company Moderna Therapeutics.
  • Moderna’s public offering of $600 million is the largest ever of a venture-capital-backed biotechnology company, reflecting the potential of its new technology: mRNA therapeutics
  • Moderna’s success in creating therapies that will benefit patients reflects the crucial role of HSCI in enabling early-stage, high-risk research.

... Read more about HSCI-supported research leads to new class of therapeutics

Healing without scars

November 7, 2018

George Murphy wants to use stem cells to replace scarring with regenerative healing.

  • George Murphy’s goal is to coax skin stem cells into healing wounds by regenerating tissue instead of forming a scar.
  • To figure out how to do it, he is studying scarless healing during fetal development and “stem cell burnout” during aging.
  • Insights into scarless healing will help research into regenerating other vital organs, including the heart.

...

Read more about Healing without scars

Can we restore sight?

November 7, 2018

Markus Frank and his colleagues are reprogramming skin cells with the goal of giving people back their sight.

  • Seed funding from HSCI led Markus Frank and his colleagues to discover that the cell surface molecule ABCB5 can be used to identify limbal stem cells, which regenerate the cornea.
  • The team is developing ABCB5-positive cell therapy as a treatment for vision loss due to limbal stem cell deficiency.

Markus Frank, M.D., co-leader of the HSCI Skin Program, is reprogramming stem cells from the skin...

Read more about Can we restore sight?

Call for Proposals: HSCI Seed Grants 2019

November 6, 2018

The Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) Invites applications for seed grant funding for its 2019 cycle. The purpose of this program is to provide funding for innovative projects in the field of stem cell and regenerative biology. As was the case last year, the HSCI strongly encourages proposals with a translational focus, or which are otherwise poised to accelerate the development of new stem cell-based therapies or cures. However, proposals at all stages of development are welcome. The HSCI intends to award up to ten grants in response to this call for proposals, contingent upon the...

Read more about Call for Proposals: HSCI Seed Grants 2019

Reinventing painkillers

November 5, 2018

Clifford Woolf wants to reboot drug discovery to find a new way to treat pain: effectively and responsibly.

  • Woolf’s goal is to stop the opioid crisis by rejecting the conventional approach to drug discovery and developing painkillers that do not harm people or communities. 
  • He is using stem cells to create models of pain, outside the body and in a dish, that can be used to screen for drugs swiftly and on a large scale.
  • The new approach requires ‘all hands’: expertise, equipment, and collaboration in stem...
Read more about Reinventing painkillers

Assassinating cancer

November 1, 2018

Mario Suva and Ramesh Shivdasani are tackling some of the toughest, meanest cancers to clear a path to better treatments.

  • Suva and Shivdasani are using every approach in their arsenal to figure out what makes cancer cells arise from healthy tissue.
  • Armed with enough new knowledge about how cancer arises, they want to take truer aim at cancer cells, the cancer cell lineage, and factors that make cells go awry.
  • Their new approach to cancer management would combine gene and cell therapies to kill the cancer...
Read more about Assassinating cancer