Brigham and Women's Hospital

Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD

Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School

The primary focus of the Ebert laboratory is the biology and treatment of clonal hematopoiesis and myeloid malignancies. Our genetic studies have led to the characterization of clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential (CHIP) and the identification of mutations in MDS that predict overall survival, outcome following bone marrow transplantation, Read more about Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD

Yick W. Fong, PhD

Yick W. Fong, PhD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School

Transcriptional mechanisms of pluripotency and cellular reprogramming

We study key transcriptional and gene regulatory events that lead to the acquisition and maintenance of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs).  ESCs can self-renew or differentiate to produce most of the cells of the body. These distinct but developmentally relevant cell fates are defined by their unique gene expression signatures. Proper execution of these developmental programs requires the precise tuning of gene expression by transcription factors, coactivators and corepressors.  Indeed, aberrant transcriptional regulation is the root of many human diseases including developmental disorders, cancers and degenerative diseases.  Read more about Yick W. Fong, PhD

Markus Frank, MD

Markus Frank, MD

Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Dermatology, Harvard Medical School

Markus Frank’s laboratory research focuses on the physiological and pathological roles of the P-glycoprotein family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) multidrug

Read more about Markus Frank, MD
Boston Children's Hospital
Enders Research Building, Room 507
300 Longwood Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
p: 617-919-2993
Wolfram Goessling, MD, PhD

Wolfram Goessling, MD, PhD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Harvard Medical School

Developmental signaling pathways govern the formation and function of stem cells, thereby holding the key to unlocking the promise of adult tissue regeneration, and to inhibiting cancer development. In our laboratory, we use zebrafish as the primary model to study the liver and explore the regulation of endodermal progenitor cell specification, organ differentiation and growth. Read more about Wolfram Goessling, MD, PhD

Jeffrey Karp, PhD

Jeffrey Karp, PhD

Brigham & Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School
Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology

Dr. Jeff Karp is an Associate Professor at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and is Principal Faculty at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, an affiliate faculty at MIT through the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, and an affiliate faculty at the Broad Institute. Read more about Jeffrey Karp, PhD

Richard Lee, MD

Richard Lee, MD

Harvard Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology
Harvard Medical School

The Lee Laboratory uses biotechnologies to discover and design new approaches to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. We work at this interface using a broad variety of techniques in genomics, stem cell biology, and molecular biology. Read more about Richard Lee, MD

George F. Murphy, MD

George F. Murphy, MD

Professor of Pathology, Harvard Medical School
Director, Program in Dermatopathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital

The Murphy Laboratory focuses on inflammatory and neoplastic disorders of the skin, with particular attention to the role of physiologic and cancer stem

Read more about George F. Murphy, MD
Brigham and Women's Hospital
221 Longwood Avenue - EBRC Suite 401
Boston, MA 02115
p: 617-525-7485
Olivier Pourquié, PhD

Olivier Pourquié, PhD

Harvard Medical School
Brigham and Women's Hospital

We are interested in the development of the vertebrate musculo-skeletal axis. Using chicken and mouse embryos as model systems, we combine developmental biology and genomic approaches to study patterning and differentiation of the precursors of muscles and vertebrae. While most of this work has been carried out in vivo, we are now developing protocols to recapitulate these early developmental processes in vitro using mouse and human embryonic or reprogrammed stem cells. We are also turning to translational approaches, using our understanding of the early development to produce cells of the muscle and vertebral lineages in vitro from pluripotent cells to study human diseases of the musculo-skeletal axis and for cell therapy approaches. Read more about Olivier Pourquié, PhD

Jerome Ritz, MD

Jerome Ritz, MD

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is widely used in the treatment of patients with hematologic malignancies, but continues to be associated with severe toxicities. Both the effectiveness and toxicity of HSCT are mediated by donor T-cells in the stem cell graft. Those T cells that target antigens expressed on recipient leukemia cells play an important role in eradicating residual tumor cells and preventing leukemia relapse after transplant. In contrast, T cells that target antigens expressed by normal tissues in the recipient are the primary mediators of graft versus host disease (GVHD) and thus lead to substantial toxicities. My laboratory focuses on the assessment of donor immune function after HSCT and characterization of the immune mechanisms responsible for graft versus leukemia (GVL) and GVHD. Read more about Jerome Ritz, MD

Khalid Shah, PhD

Khalid Shah, PhD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School

Successful treatment of brain tumors remains one of the greatest challenges in oncology. The recognition that different stem cell types, including neural stem cells (NSCs) can integrate appropriately throughout the mammalian brain following transplantation has unveiled new possibilities for their use in neural transplantation. Our laboratory has shown that different stem cell types home to sites of cerebral pathology and thus can be armed with therapeutic transgenes, a strategy that can be used to inhibit tumor growth by targeting angiogenesis or selectively inducing apoptosis in proliferating tumor cells in the brain. Read more about Khalid Shah, PhD