Harvard Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology

Paola Arlotta, PhD

Paola Arlotta, PhD

Harvard Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology

During embryonic development, neural progenitors undergo precise differentiation to generate the amazing variety of neuronal types that ultimately populate the mature brain. While some of the basic mechanisms that control general aspects of progenitor specification into neurons have been defined, the genetic programs that control the differentiation of distinct types of neurons in the brain are still largely unknown.

Chad Cowan, PhD

Chad Cowan, PhD

Harvard Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology
Massachusetts General Hospital

Our research is focused on understanding the molecular underpinnings of metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and coronary artery disease (CAD).

Jonathan G. Hoggatt, PhD

Jonathan G. Hoggatt, PhD

Massachusetts General Hospital
Harvard Medical School

The Hoggatt Laboratory is broadly interested in the stem cell niche regulatory mechanisms that govern tissue regeneration, particularly regulation by …

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Ya-Chieh Hsu, PhD

Ya-Chieh Hsu, PhD

Harvard Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology

We study how growth and differentiation are controlled, and how different cell types coordinate with one another, to maintain tissue function during development, regeneration, and repair.

Richard Lee, MD

Richard Lee, MD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology
Harvard Medical School

The Lee Laboratory uses biotechnologies to discover and design new approaches to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. We work at this interface using a broad variety of techniques in genomics, stem cell biology, and molecular biology.

Kiran Musunuru, MD, PhD, MPH

Kiran Musunuru, MD, PhD, MPH

Harvard Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology
Brigham and Women's Hospital
The Broad Institute

Our goal is to understand how naturally occurring human genetic variation protects (or predisposes) some people to cardiovascular and metabolic disease—the leading cause of death in the world—and to use that information to develop therapies that can protect the entire population from disease.

John Rinn, PhD

John Rinn, PhD

Harvard Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology

Our research aims to understand the role of long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) in establishing the distinct epigenetic states of adult and embryonic cells and their misregulation in diseases such as cancer.

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