Amy Wagers

New research implicates immune system cells in muscle healing

December 20, 2013

Harvard stem cell scientists have found that cells known primarily for tempering immune response also exist in injured muscle tissue, an unexpected role for regulatory T cells.

Regulatory T cells, or Tregs for short, accumulate in the skeletal muscles of mice after injury or after the animals developed muscular dystrophy, the researchers found. Their...

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Human muscle stem cell therapy gets help from zebrafish

November 7, 2013

Harvard Stem Cell Scientists have discovered that the same chemicals that stimulate muscle development in zebrafish can also be used to differentiate human stem cells into muscle cells in the laboratory, an historically challenging task that, now overcome, makes muscle cell therapy a more realistic clinical possibility.

The work, published this week in the journal Cell, began with a discovery by Boston Children’s Hospital researchers, led by...

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Amy Wagers receives New York Stem Cell Foundation-Robertson Stem Cell Prize

October 15, 2013

The New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) announced today that Amy Wagers, PhD, Professor at Harvard University, will be the 2013 recipient of the NYSCF – Robertson Stem Cell Prize, which has been awarded since 2011 for extraordinary achievements in translational stem cell research by a younger scientist.

Dr. Wagers is...

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An HSCI approach to rhabdomyosarcoma

September 29, 2013

Rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare childhood cancer that arises in muscle stem cells. Between 250-350 cases are treated each year. The disease most commonly begins as a noticeable swelling in the arms, legs, head, neck, or groin, and is treated by surgical removal of the tumor, as well as chemotherapy or irradiation. Currently, about 80% of patients diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma survive, as the disease is often caught early enough for intervention.

In this feature, one senior investigator, one junior investigator, and one postdoctoral researcher—all working...

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Cross-country collaboration leads to new model of leukemia development

July 31, 2013

Eight years ago, two former Stanford University postdoctoral fellows, one of them still in California and the other at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) in Cambridge, began exchanging theories about why patients with leukemia stop producing healthy blood cells. What was it, they asked, that caused bone marrow to stop producing normal blood-producing cells?... Read more about Cross-country collaboration leads to new model of leukemia development