Cancer

George F. Murphy, MD

George F. Murphy, MD

Professor of Pathology, Harvard Medical School
Director, Program in Dermatopathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital

The Murphy Laboratory focuses on inflammatory and neoplastic disorders of the skin, with particular attention to the role of physiologic and cancer stem...

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Brigham and Women's Hospital
221 Longwood Avenue - EBRC Suite 401
Boston, MA 02115
p: 617-525-7485
Jerome Ritz, MD

Jerome Ritz, MD

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is widely used in the treatment of patients with hematologic malignancies, but continues to be associated with severe toxicities. Both the effectiveness and toxicity of HSCT are mediated by donor T-cells in the stem cell graft. Those T cells that target antigens expressed on recipient leukemia cells play an important role in eradicating residual tumor cells and preventing leukemia relapse after transplant. In contrast, T cells that target antigens expressed by normal tissues in the recipient are the primary mediators of graft versus host disease (GVHD) and thus lead to substantial toxicities. My laboratory focuses on the assessment of donor immune function after HSCT and characterization of the immune mechanisms responsible for graft versus leukemia (GVL) and GVHD.... Read more about Jerome Ritz, MD

Khalid Shah, MS, PhD

Khalid Shah, MS, PhD

Vice Chair of Research, Brigham and Women's Hospital
Director, Center for Stem Cell Therapeutics and Imaging, Harvard Medical School

Successful treatment of brain tumors remains one of the greatest challenges in oncology. The recognition that different stem cell types, including neural stem cells (NSCs) can integrate appropriately throughout the mammalian brain following transplantation has unveiled new possibilities for their use in neural transplantation. Our laboratory has shown that different stem cell types home to sites of cerebral pathology and thus can be armed with therapeutic transgenes, a strategy that can be used to inhibit tumor growth by targeting angiogenesis or selectively inducing apoptosis in proliferating tumor cells in the brain.... Read more about Khalid Shah, MS, PhD

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