Cardiovascular Diseases

Richard Lee, MD

Richard Lee, MD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard University Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology
Harvard Medical School

The Lee Laboratory uses biotechnologies to discover and design new approaches to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. We work at this interface using a broad variety of techniques in genomics, stem cell biology, and molecular biology. Our approach is to understand human problems and design solutions in the laboratory, and then we demonstrate the effectiveness of these solutions in vivo. Ongoing projects in the laboratory include studies of cardiac regeneration, diabetes, aging and metabolism.

Ronglih Liao, PhD

Ronglih Liao, PhD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School

Following tissue injury, the inability of the heart to adequately replace damaged cells results in a deleterious process of molecular and structural remodeling, ultimately causing chronic cardiac dysfunction.

Calum MacRae, MD, PhD

Calum MacRae, MD, PhD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School

Our lab is interested in the role of functional inputs such as mechanical forces, metabolism or electrical activity in refining the basic programs of cell specification and differentiation in cardiovascular development, disease, repair and regeneration.

Harald C. Ott, MD

Harald C. Ott, MD

Massachusetts General Hospital
Harvard Medical School

Dr. Harald C. Ott is a fellow in cardiothoracic surgery at the Massachusetts General Hospital and an Instructor in Surgery at the Harvard Medical School.

Kevin Kit Parker, PhD

Kevin Kit Parker, PhD

Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering

My research team's focus is on understanding cellular mechanotransduction in the heart.

William T. Pu, MD

William T. Pu, MD

Boston Children's Hospital
Harvard Medical School

Goals of Dr. Pu's research include:
1. To understand the transcriptional network regulating heart development and disease
2. To understand cell lineage specification in heart development and regeneration
3. To understand genetic contributions to congenital heart disease.