Jonathan G. Hoggatt, PhD

Jonathan G. Hoggatt, PhD

Massachusetts General Hospital
Harvard Medical School
Jonathan G. Hoggatt, PhD

The Hoggatt Laboratory is broadly interested in the stem cell niche regulatory mechanisms that govern tissue regeneration, particularly regulation by macrophages. The lab also has a specific interest in translational science for bone marrow transplantation and other treatments. The laboratory has identified a unique “highly engraftable” hematopoietic stem cell that is currently being investigated and has applications for further probing of stem cell niche biology and clinical applications in stem cell transplantation, gene therapy, and other fields. The lab has also developed unique genetic mouse models allowing for the dynamic exploration of macrophage heterogeneity in a variety of disease settings.

Our Goal

Research efforts over the last several decades working to develop therapies have largely focused on finding “magic bullets”, a small molecule or perhaps protein biologic that can be given to a patient as a drug to cure their disease. We believe the that the cures of the future will come from tapping in to the body’s natural regenerative capacities, or will use cellular therapies, namely stem cell transplantation. Our goal is to discover new regenerative pathways within the body to allow for disease correction and to make stem cell transplantation faster, safer, cheaper, and better to broaden its use to more patients.

Bio-Sketch

Jon Hoggatt holds appointments in both the Cancer Center and Center for Transplantation Sciences. He is also a principal faculty member of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute and a principal faculty member of the Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology Department at Harvard University.

Jon obtained his PhD from Indiana University School of Medicine in 2010, where his dissertation was recognized as the most outstanding amongst all disciplines and awarded the Esther L. Kinsley award. He then completed a post-doctoral fellowship with David Scadden at Harvard University, where he received an HSCI T32 training award, and an NIH Pathway to Independence award.

Jon’s work over the last several years has focused on translational science in bone marrow transplantation, and has resulted in several clinical trials and high profile papers in Nature, Nature Medicine, and others. During his graduate studies, Jon served as a Police Commissioner and then later as a City Councilman for West Lafayette, Indiana. He currently serves the American Society of Hematology on the Government Affairs and Communications Committees and is a Contributing Editor of The Hematologist.

Contact Information

149 13th Street, CNY Building 149, Room 5.301, Boston, MA 02129
p: 617-726-6516

Research Interest(s)