Cancer

Hava Avraham, PhD

Hava Avraham, PhD

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

My lab has focused on the identification of novel genes and pathways regulating hematopoiesis and the role of these genes in malignancy.

George Q. Daley, MD, PhD

George Q. Daley, MD, PhD

Boston Children's Hospital
Harvard Medical School
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

George Q. Daley, M.D., Ph.D, seeks to translate insights in stem cell biology into improved therapies for genetic and malignant diseases. Important research contributions from his laboratory include the creation of customized stem cells to treat genetic immune deficiency in a mouse model (together with Rudolf Jaenisch), the differentiation of germ cells from embryonic stem cells (cited as a “Top Ten Breakthrough” by Science magazine in 2003), and the generation of disease-specific pluripotent stem cells by direct reprogramming of human fibroblasts (cited in the “Breakthrough of the Year” issue of Science magazine in 2008). 

Patricia K. Donahoe, MD

Patricia K. Donahoe, MD

Massachusetts General Hospital
Harvard Medical School

The Pediatric Surgical Research Laboratories focus on Developmental Biology, some areas of which hold promise for clinical application to benefit both pediatric and adult patients.

Benjamin Ebert, MD

Benjamin Ebert, MD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School

We study the biology and treatment of cancer using hematopoiesis as a model system. The laboratory employs a range of genomic technologies as well as classical cellular and molecular biology approaches to investigate the biology of specific human diseases, particularly hematopoietic malignancies and disorders of red blood cell production.

Wolfram Goessling, MD, PhD

Wolfram Goessling, MD, PhD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Harvard Medical School

Developmental signaling pathways govern the formation and function of stem cells, thereby holding the key to unlocking the promise of adult tissue regeneration, and to inhibiting cancer development. In our laboratory, we use zebrafish as the primary model to study the liver and explore the regulation of endodermal progenitor cell specification, organ differentiation and growth.

David M. Langenau, PhD

David M. Langenau, PhD

Massachusetts General Hospital

Our research focuses on using the zebrafish to better understand human cancer and to develop novel insights into how it is that tumors can be remade following conventional chemotherapeutic intervention. Uncovering the downstream molecular pathways that lead to relapse will be integral to identifying novel drugs for the treatment of cancer.