Blood Diseases

Suneet Agarwal, MD, PhD

Suneet Agarwal, MD, PhD

Boston Children's Hospital

Certain genetic disorders cause widespread disease in the body, but the principle reason for illness and death in early childhood is failure of the blood system.  We would like to study these genetic blood disorders by “turning back the clock” – using new technology in stem cell biology to take skin cells from patients with genetic blood disorders and return them to an embryonic-like state, wherein they regain the ability to form any type of cell in the body. 

Benjamin Ebert, MD

Benjamin Ebert, MD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School

We study the biology and treatment of cancer using hematopoiesis as a model system. The laboratory employs a range of genomic technologies as well as classical cellular and molecular biology approaches to investigate the biology of specific human diseases, particularly hematopoietic malignancies and disorders of red blood cell production.

Thomas S. Kupper, MD

Thomas S. Kupper, MD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Harvard Medical School

Our laboratory is interested in how immune responses in skin are initiated, and how T cell mediated memory responses occur in skin, and in particular a newly described population of antigen experienced T cells known as Resident Memory T Cell (TRM).

David M. Langenau, PhD

David M. Langenau, PhD

Massachusetts General Hospital
Harvard Medical School

Our research focuses on using the zebrafish to better understand human cancer and to develop novel insights into how it is that tumors can be remade following conventional chemotherapeutic intervention. Uncovering the downstream molecular pathways that lead to relapse will be integral to identifying novel drugs for the treatment of cancer.

Jerome Ritz, MD

Jerome Ritz, MD

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is widely used in the treatment of patients with hematologic malignancies, but continues to be associated with severe toxicities. Both the effectiveness and toxicity of HSCT are mediated by donor T-cells in the stem cell graft. Those T cells that target antigens expressed on recipient leukemia cells play an important role in eradicating residual tumor cells and preventing leukemia relapse after transplant. In contrast, T cells that target antigens expressed by normal tissues in the recipient are the primary mediators of graft versus host disease (GVHD) and thus lead to substantial toxicities. My laboratory focuses on the assessment of donor immune function after HSCT and characterization of the immune mechanisms responsible for graft versus leukemia (GVL) and GVHD.

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