Howard Hughes Medical Institute

George Q. Daley, MD, PhD

George Q. Daley, MD, PhD

Boston Children's Hospital
Harvard Medical School
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

George Q. Daley, M.D., Ph.D, seeks to translate insights in stem cell biology into improved therapies for genetic and malignant diseases. Important research contributions from his laboratory include the creation of customized stem cells to treat genetic immune deficiency in a mouse model (together with Rudolf Jaenisch), the differentiation of germ cells from embryonic stem cells (cited as a “Top Ten Breakthrough” by Science magazine in 2003), and the generation of disease-specific pluripotent stem cells by direct reprogramming of human fibroblasts (cited in the “Breakthrough of the Year” issue of Science magazine in 2008). 

Kevin C. Eggan, PhD

Kevin C. Eggan, PhD

Harvard University Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

As a young investigator in the burgeoning field of stem cell biology, Dr. Eggan has garnered international recognition for his seminal work and a number of high profile awards for his creativity and productivity, including the MacArthur Foundation “Genius Grant” in 2006. His current research focuses on applying the knowledge gained in stem cell biology to studying the mechanisms underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and discovering new therapeutic targets.

Stuart Orkin, MD

Stuart Orkin, MD

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston Children's Hospital
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

The laboratory utilizes multidisciplinary approaches to understand how mammalian cells choose specific fates and how mutations in important transcriptional regulators lead to developmental defects or malignancy.

Christopher A. Walsh, MD, PhD

Christopher A. Walsh, MD, PhD

Boston Children's Hospital
Harvard Medical School
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Our lab is interested in identifying genes that direct the development of the cerebral cortex, not only because of their disease-related importance but also because they tell us about the normal development and evolution of the brain.