Brigham and Women's Hospital

Joseph V. Bonventre, MD, PhD

Joseph V. Bonventre, MD, PhD

Brigham and Women's Hospital

Dr. Bonventre is Chief of the Renal Unit and Director of the Bioengineering Division at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and has had a long-standing interest in various aspects of cellular injury and repair mechanisms in the kidney with a special emphasis on the role of inflammation, biomarkers and stem cells.

Benjamin Ebert, MD

Benjamin Ebert, MD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School

We study the biology and treatment of cancer using hematopoiesis as a model system. The laboratory employs a range of genomic technologies as well as classical cellular and molecular biology approaches to investigate the biology of specific human diseases, particularly hematopoietic malignancies and disorders of red blood cell production.

Yick W. Fong, PhD

Yick W. Fong, PhD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School

Transcriptional mechanisms of pluripotency and cellular reprogramming

We study key transcriptional and gene regulatory events that lead to the acquisition and maintenance of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs).  ESCs can self-renew or differentiate to produce most of the cells of the body. These distinct but developmentally relevant cell fates are defined by their unique gene expression signatures. Proper execution of these developmental programs requires the precise tuning of gene expression by transcription factors, coactivators and corepressors.  Indeed, aberrant transcriptional regulation is the root of many human diseases including developmental disorders, cancers and degenerative diseases. 

Wolfram Goessling, MD, PhD

Wolfram Goessling, MD, PhD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Harvard Medical School

Developmental signaling pathways govern the formation and function of stem cells, thereby holding the key to unlocking the promise of adult tissue regeneration, and to inhibiting cancer development. In our laboratory, we use zebrafish as the primary model to study the liver and explore the regulation of endodermal progenitor cell specification, organ differentiation and growth.

Benjamin Humphreys, MD, PhD

Benjamin Humphreys, MD, PhD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Harvard Medical School

The mission of the Humphreys Lab is to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of kidney injury and repair and to translate this knowledge into new therapeutic strategies to treat patients suffering from kidney disease.

Jeffrey Karp, PhD

Jeffrey Karp, PhD

Brigham & Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School
Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology

Dr. Jeff Karp is an Associate Professor at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and is Principal Faculty at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute and affiliate faculty at MIT through the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology.

His research harnesses materials science and stem cell biology to solve medical problems with emphasis on nanoscale/microscale materials and bio-inspired approaches.

Thomas S. Kupper, MD

Thomas S. Kupper, MD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Harvard Medical School

Our laboratory is interested in how immune responses in skin are initiated, and how T cell mediated memory responses occur in skin, and in particular a newly described population of antigen experienced T cells known as Resident Memory T Cell (TRM).

Richard Lee, MD

Richard Lee, MD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard University Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology
Harvard Medical School

The Lee Laboratory uses biotechnologies to discover and design new approaches to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. We work at this interface using a broad variety of techniques in genomics, stem cell biology, and molecular biology. Our approach is to understand human problems and design solutions in the laboratory, and then we demonstrate the effectiveness of these solutions in vivo. Ongoing projects in the laboratory include studies of cardiac regeneration, diabetes, aging and metabolism.

Ronglih Liao, PhD

Ronglih Liao, PhD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School

Following tissue injury, the inability of the heart to adequately replace damaged cells results in a deleterious process of molecular and structural remodeling, ultimately causing chronic cardiac dysfunction.

Calum MacRae, MD, PhD

Calum MacRae, MD, PhD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School

Our lab is interested in the role of functional inputs such as mechanical forces, metabolism or electrical activity in refining the basic programs of cell specification and differentiation in cardiovascular development, disease, repair and regeneration.

Kiran Musunuru, MD, PhD, MPH

Kiran Musunuru, MD, PhD, MPH

Harvard University Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology
Brigham and Women's Hospital
The Broad Institute

Our goal is to understand how naturally occurring human genetic variation protects (or predisposes) some people to cardiovascular and metabolic disease—the leading cause of death in the world—and to use that information to develop therapies that can protect the entire population from disease.

Olivier Pourquié, PhD

Olivier Pourquié, PhD

Harvard Medical School
Brigham and Women's Hospital

We are interested in the development of the vertebrate musculo-skeletal axis. Using chicken and mouse embryos as model systems, we combine developmental biology and genomic approaches to study patterning and differentiation of the precursors of muscles and vertebrae. While most of this work has been carried out in vivo, we are now developing protocols to recapitulate these early developmental processes in vitro using mouse and human embryonic or reprogrammed stem cells. We are also turning to translational approaches, using our understanding of the early development to produce cells of the muscle and vertebral lineages in vitro from pluripotent cells to study human diseases of the musculo-skeletal axis and for cell therapy approaches.

Jerome Ritz, MD

Jerome Ritz, MD

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is widely used in the treatment of patients with hematologic malignancies, but continues to be associated with severe toxicities. Both the effectiveness and toxicity of HSCT are mediated by donor T-cells in the stem cell graft. Those T cells that target antigens expressed on recipient leukemia cells play an important role in eradicating residual tumor cells and preventing leukemia relapse after transplant. In contrast, T cells that target antigens expressed by normal tissues in the recipient are the primary mediators of graft versus host disease (GVHD) and thus lead to substantial toxicities. My laboratory focuses on the assessment of donor immune function after HSCT and characterization of the immune mechanisms responsible for graft versus leukemia (GVL) and GVHD.

Jessica  Whited, PhD

Jessica Whited, PhD

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School

Humans and other mammals have extremely limited regenerative capabilities in key parts such as limbs.  Nearly two million Americans are currently living with the consequences of having undergone limb amputation due to injury or disease, and this number is expected to rise. No biological therapeutic has been devised to address this problem.